INSTALLATION GUIDELINES:

Pre-installation & job site conditions

It is the installer/owners responsibility to check and ensure that the job site is environmentally and structurally acceptable prior to the installation of Wego International Floors.

NORMAL LIVING CONDITIONS

The job site must be climate controlled “normal living conditions” for at least one week before any wood flooring is delivered.

The National Wood Flooring Association states that wood floors perform best when the home's environment is within “normal living conditions”:

  • Relative humidity is between 40% to 50% (preferably 45% to 50%).
  • Temperature is from 60º F to 80º F (preferably 68º F to 72º F).
  • Thermostat fan switch is left “ON” to provide a constant flow of air across the floor.

ACCLIMATION OF SOLID WOOD FLOORING

Acclimation is not a “length of time measurement”, it is a function of making sure the moisture content of the floor boards to be installed are within a 2% range of the sub floor’s moisture content.

Stack boxes in an alternating cross manner, at least 4” off the sub floor, to allow air circulation. Open box ends and any plastic wrap. If possible, spread out individual boards in the rooms to be installed. Leave them sitting for at least one week. This will allow boards to acclimate to the “normal living conditions” that will be experienced when the job is finished and occupied.

ACCLIMATION OF ENGINEERED FLOORING

Because engineered floor boards are much more stable, Wego recommends the following:

Store on the job site
  • For 72 hours
  • At “normal living conditions” as described above
  • Leave boards in sealed cartons until installation

FAILURE TO CONDUCT MOISTURE TESTING IS THE NUMBER ONE INSTALL ER ERROR

The installer must conduct mandatory moisture testing of wood floor boards and sub floors. Use a pin type moisture meter on boards and wood sub floors. Concrete substrates require “special” concrete meters or calcium chloride testing. Planks (3” or wider) boards must have a moisture content that is within 2% of the moisture content in the sub floor. Strip (2 1/4”) boards must be within 4%.

CONCRET ESUBSTRATES – ONLY FOR ENGINEERED FLOORING – CALCIUM CHLORIDE TEST

Moisture transfer must not exceed 3 lbs/1000 square feet with this test. One test must be performed every 250 square feet. These test kits can be found at installation supply firms, online at www.taylortools.com, or by calling (888) 216-TEST (8378).

TRAMEX CONCRETE MOISTURE ENCOUN TER METER

Moisture readings using this meter should not exceed 4.5 on the upper scale. www.tramexltd.com

MOISTURE BARRIER SYSTEMS

The following moisture barrier systems are recommended. They carry a warranty from their manufacturer:

Bostik – MVP4

Please remember that your warranty against moisture vapor transmission comes from the manufacturer of the sealer. Wego does not warranty products we do not manufacture.

INSTALLER MUST CHECK CRAWL SPACE

The National Wood Flooring Association installation guidelines states, in Section 1, Chapter 1, Page 1, "Acceptable Job Site Conditions", that the installer/retailer is responsible for checking to see if the job site conditions are acceptable for a wood floor installation. These checks should be done long before the installer arrives on the job site to start the installation. In this case, a quick inspection when the job estimated would have revealed that the crawl space was unacceptable, and therefore the job site was not ready for a wood flooring installation. Current guidelines for crawl spaces are: "There must be a minimum of 18" from the ground to the underneath side of joists, they must be dry (no apparent or standing water) and must be covered 100 percent by a vapor retarder of 6-mil black polyethylene that is overlapped 6" and lapped up the walls 6". Crawl spaces also should have 1.5 percent of open venting per 1,000 square feet (92.90 square meters) of floor area, and the venting should be properly located to foster cross ventilation. In addition to these guidelines, installers must check and follow local building codes.

CONCRETE SUBSTRATE MUST BE LEVEL

It is the installer's responsibility to make sure the concrete substrate is flat within 1/8" in 6' and 3/16” in 10 feet. If it is not, then the high points must be ground down and the low valleys filled with leveling compound. Furthermore, the concrete substrate must be free of all contaminants, i.e. paint, varnish, kerosene from heaters, dry wall paste, crayon marks, grit, soil, and other foreign chemicals and substances. Once they proceed to install the floor, they are assuring all of the parties involved that the concrete substrate has been inspected, is level, free of all contaminants, and is acceptable, resulting in a properly installed floor.

WOOD SUBFLOOR MUST BE LEVEL

In the Chapter 4 of The National Wood Flooring Association's Installation Guidelines (Wood Subfloor Guidelines), it states that wood subfloors must be flat, clean, dry, structurally sound, free of squeaks, and free of protruding fasteners. For installations using mechanical fasteners of 1 1/2” and longer, the subfloor should be flat to within 1/4” in 10', or 3/16” in 6'. For glue down installations, and installations using mechanical fasteners of less than 1 1/2”, the subfloor should be flat to within 3/16” in 10', or 1/8” in 6'. If peaks or valleys in the subfloor exceed the tolerances specified above, sand down the high spots and fill the low spots with a leveling compound or other material approved for use under wood flooring. However, it is the builder's or general contractor's responsibility to provide the wood flooring contractor with a subfloor that is within the tolerances listed above. If there is movement or squeaks in the subfloor, refasten the subfloor to the joists in problem areas. Protruding fasteners are easily remedied by driving those fasteners deeper into the subfloor.

DRY LAY FLOOR FIRST

You should expect variations in color tones, shade, grain, and character marks in your wood flooring. Meet with your installer. Have them open the boxes and pull boards at random from many different cartons. Then ask them to dry lay and arrange planks to suit your personal taste. Now is the time to let the installer know what you like and dislike before they install the first board.

HOME OWNER – END USER RESPONSIBILITY

Your presence during the installation is crucial. Approximately 40% of installation failures and/or customer dissatisfaction are due to installer error. If you choose not to be present, you forgo the ability and right to participate in the board selection process. In doing so, you have left it up to the installer's judgment for arranging floor boards according to natural variations such as color, grain, and length. Neither the wood flooring manufacturer nor the seller can be held responsible for any unpleasant surprise resulting from the installer's lack of qualifications or poor judgment. Once installed, you and the installer own the floor. The responsibility to resolve any dispute is between you and your installer. This has long been an industry accepted rule.